I walked up all of these today. #StepUpMountain 20th floor in Battersea's Somerset estate. #StepUpMountain

Step Up Skyline Expedition

You don’t have to go to the ends of the Earth to go on an extraordinary journey.

This September I will ascend the height of a mountain by walking up stairwells in buildings. Mountain’s are anything over 2,000 feet (610 metres) in height. As most floors in buildings are 10 feet apart, this means walking up 200 floors.

For the Step Up Skyline Expedition I am challenging myself to walk the height of Mount Everest (29,029ft) by exploring London’s tallest buildings. This is a creative way to explore London’s skyline and I am looking forward to meeting people who live and work in London’s highrise communities. The walk is going to give me an entirely new perspective on London not only because of the tall vantage points, but the experience of trying to gain access to so many different kinds of buildings.

I am doing this expedition from September 8th with the support of Ordnance Survey, Great Britain’s mapping authority. They are helping me find the buildings to climb, routes to take and places to explore. This geographic information is at the very heart of all the planning that we are doing. They’ve also whipped up this great mapping tool. Type in the number of steps that you have climbed and the calculator will show you on a map the name of a hill or mountain that you have ascended the equivalent height of.

Step Up Mountain Challenge

You can do your own Step Up Challenge by walking the height of a mountain and you don’t even have to leave your home or school, all you need is a good staircase.

Take part by:

  • walking 1 floor every day for 200 days,
  • walking the height as a team. 200 people could walk 1 floor once, or
  • walking the height of a named mountain.

You could walk the height of:

  • Slieve Donard (850m), the highest mountain in Northern Ireland,
  • Scafell Pike (912m), the highest mountain in England,
  • Snowdon (1085m), the highest mountain in Wales,
  • Ben Nevis (1344m), the highest mountain in Scotland, or
  • something even higher!

Please connect with me on Twitter @DanRavenEllison if you are planning on doing your own Step Up Challenge during the week beginning September 8th. I would love to hear from you. We will be tweeting using the hashtag #StepUpMountain.


Children are like an endangered species in many of London’s woods

A few days ago I walked across London from Croydon in South London to Barnet in North London. Part of London Tree Week my aim was to pass through London’s urban forest by staying within some of the city’s most leafy wards. The route made use of the London LOOP, Capital Ring, the London Green Chain, Thames Footpath (very briefly) and the Dollis Valley Green Walk.

According to my FitBit between 5am and 10pm I walked 75km. Carrying a Canon 5D and a GoPro I took a photo every 3 seconds looking up to the tree canopy and from the photographs I made the experimental time-lapse film above. The occasional breaks that you see without any trees are open green spaces, not built-up areas. The only other break is as I cross over Battersea Bridge. Otherwise nearly every frame includes at least part of a tree.

There are over 8 million trees in London and by 2025 this will increase to 8.5 million thanks to the RE:LEAF campaign.

I walked the transect on the Friday of London’s half-term school holiday. Despite this when passing through London’s woodlands I saw deer, foxes, woodpeckers and snakes but not one single child. This echoes of the Last Child in the Woods, in which Richard Louvre “directly links the lack of nature in the lives of today’s wired generation—he calls it nature-deficit—to some of the most disturbing childhood trends, such as the rises in obesity, attention disorders, and depression”.

What does this mean for London’s future?

George Monbiot rightly proposes that we rewild our landscape. We need to rewild ourselves too and creating a Greater London National Park would be a radical step in the right direction, especially for our children.

 


Say hello to #GeoEdChat

#GeoEdChat

A short time ago I set GeoEdChat.com live. It’s a new effort from a group of us in The Geography Collective that we hope will bring about new relationships, thinking, practices and initiatives that will improve geography education. The idea follows #UKedChat and other hashtag based Twitter conversations that bring together educators to talk on a specific theme. #GeoEdChat is especially for anyone interested in geography education and will take place every Wednesday. It does not matter what your specialism is or the age of the people you work with, if you have something to say or want to learn more about geography education then this new site should be useful for you.

All educators clearly have different experiences of geography. We all work in different settings and situations, often with different aims and objectives. That said, the world we occupy and the internet that reaches around it are shared between us and together we can use one to influence the other. #GeoEdChat is an international, new and focussed opportunity to develop and share ideas and practices in geography education. I do hope that you’ll join us.

 


Electronica Geographica

I’m slowly working on an exploration through electronic geographic music Spotify. Check it out here and let me know what you think along with any suggestions for additions.

 


Guerrilla Geography at Glastonbury

Some images of some guerrilla geography I helped make happen along with other members of The Geography Collective at Glastonbury Festival 2011.

The camp

Making sea monsters to explore the Green Kidz ship!

Monster explorers!

Seeing the world like you are a tiny ickle person..

Wearing masks to see through new eyes..

3/4 of the Glastonbury team. I’m behind the camera.


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