I walked up all of these today. #StepUpMountain 20th floor in Battersea's Somerset estate. #StepUpMountain

Step Up Skyline Expedition

You don’t have to go to the ends of the Earth to go on an extraordinary journey.

This September I will ascend the height of a mountain by walking up stairwells in buildings. Mountain’s are anything over 2,000 feet (610 metres) in height. As most floors in buildings are 10 feet apart, this means walking up 200 floors.

For the Step Up Skyline Expedition I am challenging myself to walk the height of Mount Everest (29,029ft) by exploring London’s tallest buildings. This is a creative way to explore London’s skyline and I am looking forward to meeting people who live and work in London’s highrise communities. The walk is going to give me an entirely new perspective on London not only because of the tall vantage points, but the experience of trying to gain access to so many different kinds of buildings.

I am doing this expedition from September 8th with the support of Ordnance Survey, Great Britain’s mapping authority. They are helping me find the buildings to climb, routes to take and places to explore. This geographic information is at the very heart of all the planning that we are doing. They’ve also whipped up this great mapping tool. Type in the number of steps that you have climbed and the calculator will show you on a map the name of a hill or mountain that you have ascended the equivalent height of.

Step Up Mountain Challenge

You can do your own Step Up Challenge by walking the height of a mountain and you don’t even have to leave your home or school, all you need is a good staircase.

Take part by:

  • walking 1 floor every day for 200 days,
  • walking the height as a team. 200 people could walk 1 floor once, or
  • walking the height of a named mountain.

You could walk the height of:

  • Slieve Donard (850m), the highest mountain in Northern Ireland,
  • Scafell Pike (912m), the highest mountain in England,
  • Snowdon (1085m), the highest mountain in Wales,
  • Ben Nevis (1344m), the highest mountain in Scotland, or
  • something even higher!

Please connect with me on Twitter @DanRavenEllison if you are planning on doing your own Step Up Challenge during the week beginning September 8th. I would love to hear from you. We will be tweeting using the hashtag #StepUpMountain.


We are Crafty Explorers

Over the last few months I have been working with an outstanding team on Crafty Explorers, an innovative project to improve the health of children aged 5 and below. A response to the Knee High Project design challenge that is run by the Design Council and funded by Guy’s & St Thomas’ Charity, Crafty Explorers is a friendly and affordable place for families to make clay creatures.

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Other than boogly googly eyes all of the materials we use are natural and could be found for free with a bit of foraging. Acorn tops and pebbles make great eyes too though, so some are 100% natural. After making their crafty creatures we challenge children to complete missions with them in local parks. Challenges include going outside into green spaces to fly, climb, make a nest, find a worm, hide from pigeons and many more.

Crafty Explorers (5)

The pop-up shop that we opened to trial our ideas in Nunhead (Southwark, south London) was a massive success. Parents reported that we were having a positive influence on the physical and mental health of their children, as well as helping them to connect with nature and learn new skills. Many families came back several times over the six weeks that we were open and a few visited us daily for periods. This is high street, popular and engaging “learning outside the classroom” and “fieldwork” that we have linked to local schools, but is independent of them.

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The building was provided by Southwark Council who are doing some great work to lift Nunhead’s village high street. With many central shopping areas in the middle of identity crises, we can see a role for Crafty Explorers not just in helping to improve the health of children, but in being an alternative centre for communities.

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Helen, Carolina, Lesley, Tom, Alan, Pete and Mark are just a few of the excellent people from Explorer HQ, The Geography Collective and City Farmers who have come together to work on Crafty Explorers. A blend of great design, simple ideas, deep thinking and positive energy made the shop the success that it was.

Crafty Explorers (1)

The pilot shop is now closed, but the project lives on. This week we present our research, ideas and plans to the Knee High Project panels. With a blend of skill, hard work and luck we may just get through to the next stage of the design challenge. This will give us some added support to help bring Crafty Explorers to the next level.

Nunhead Cemetery (1)

 


Get ready for Mission:Explore Water

Rain stencil 2.1

I am currently working with the Mission:Explore team on a new Mission:Explore Water eBook. The free download follows our series of outdoor activity books Mission:Explore, Mission:Explore Camping, Mission:Explore on the Road and Mission:Explore Food and numerous free publications including Mission:Explore John Muir (which is available in English, Welsh and Gaelic) and Mission:Explore RSPB Big Wild Sleepout.   The water book includes over 50 illustrated missions that playfully challenge children to think about water in curious, creative and critical ways. Alan Parkinson has been working on a set of supporting resources for schools, Helen Steer has been producing the book and the illustrations are by Tom Morgan-Jones. Made in partnership with some fantastic organisations, we’ll be making full announcements about how to download the book soon(ish).

I love this mission illustration as it gives you a great idea of what guerrilla geography and the book is all about. It’s also a great and affordable mission to do on your own, with children or with friends. Do you recognise the artist that we are giving a nod to?


Join The Great Nature Project – See an #animal or #plant > take a picture > share it with #GreatNature

GNP puffin big 015

The Great Nature Project is a truly awesome project to explore nature and to share our discoveries, may they be microscopic or massive.

“The Great Nature Project is a worldwide celebration of the planet and its wonders. People of all ages are invited to appreciate nature by taking pictures of plants and animals in their worlds, and then sharing those pictures with the whole world. Together we’ll create a global snapshot of the Earth’s incredible biodiversity—and try for a Guinness World Records® Title for the largest-ever online album of animal photos!

The Great Nature Project is one of the largest initiatives National Geographic has ever created, but we need your help to pull it off. So get outside, explore, and connect, and join us for a project as big as the world itself.” The Great Nature Project 

In my last post I described how “tech time” and “wild time” do not have to conflict, but can compliment and converge with each other. For parents, teachers and carers wanting to excite and enthuse young people about the natural world, The Great Nature Project is an incredible opportunity to inspire outdoor exploration and learning through technology. The project is not just about finding and photographing wildlife, but coming together with thousands of other people in a collaborative and social exploration of our planet that is bringing us together within a common cause. As a National Geographic ambassador for the project, I will be delighted if you decide to take part and share it with your friends and community.

Taking part is very easy.

  1. Spot an animal or plant
  2. Photograph it
  3. Upload and share it on a photo-sharing site with the hashtag #GreatNature

I have just uploaded a bunch of pictures that I have taken while on Route 125 to my Instagram and will be sharing lots more over coming days. I am looking forward to sharing lots of pigeons, crows and more familiar wildlife that sometimes get a little less love but are just as wild as some of the more charismatic of creatures.

To find out more about the project visit The Great Nature Project website.

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Tech Time vs. Wild Time for Kids

I have just returned from an 18-day trip with my 10 year old son in which we completed nearly 30 adventures. From Cumbria to the Shetland Islands, we have climbed mountains, jumped down gorges, slept on wild beaches and rescued a stranded sheep by sea kayak – all part of our Route 125 project with National Geographic and Toyota. Despite the wild nature of our explorations technology played a significant role in shaping our experiences – for both good and bad.

Tent iPad

As a parent and educator (I make the distinction, but all parents are educators) I always struggled with finding the right balance between my son’s screen time vs other activities. While some children are deprived of ‘wild time’ connected to nature, so too are some children deprived of important ‘screen time’ to technology. Wild and screen time are often pitched against each other in a simplistic and dichotomised way, but the reality is far more complex.

Seals

Nature and technology can conflict, complement, supplement and/or converge in a multitude of different ways. During our micro-expedition, Minecraft on our iPad definitely distracted Seb to his detriment on a number of occasions. He had to be asked not to play while on ferries between Scottish islands in order to be forced to notice castles and wildlife, something he enjoyed but needed help to experience. While I am a great supporter of Minecraft and can see a wide range of creative possibilities for its use in the wild, my experience was that it often conflicted with the many alternative opportunities around us.

On Slieve Donnard

We also took a laptop with us that included a range of software. Seb used it to write stories, many of which were influenced by the people we met and places we visited. When we climbed Slieve Donnard (the highest mountain in Northern Ireland) we loaded up GarageBand, a piece of software for composing music. Inspired by the cold winds, menacing clouds and deep quarries we collaboratively created a piece of dark dance music. Both storytelling and musical composition have helped Seb to tune into places in a deeper way, helping him to think through, sense and make sense of the places we have explored. Without a doubt, these complimentary uses of technology have been highly rewarding.

We have also used technology to supplement our time in the wild. WhatsApp is an application for sending messages, holding group conversations, sharing locations, photos and videos. Being able to communicate with friends and family may not be essential to have a ‘wild time’ but being connected helped us to feel secure and grounded in place, helping us take comfort from knowing we could reach out to those close to us. Enjoying nature does not have to mean feeling emotionally remote, even if we are physically remote. SMS and phone calls fit into this category too.

Jump

Finally, we have used technologies that converge with the wild, dovetailing into what I call a kind ‘wildware’ that has inspired or supported our enjoyment of nature and wild places.  GeoCaching, Mission:Explore and Wild Time are just three examples of applications, services and games that not only inspire ways to engage with nature, but also link us to a wider network of users that can offer a sense of community even when we are remote from or do not even know each other. In some cases these technologies can even record data such as wildlife sightings that can help conservation programmes and so nature itself.

Exploring is often boring and gruelling. Waiting for ferries or even climbing a mountain for hours can become dull especially for an active and youthful mind. When Seb and I climbed Ben Nevis we were taking breaks every 20 minutes until we started playing word ‘association’ and ‘listing’ games. Once these games started we walked for 90 minutes uphill without a break. The game may not have been ‘screen time’ but it was definitely a distraction from our surroundings and a myriad of learning opportunities. Playing Minecraft while waiting for a ferry may also have had a distracting effect, but Seb’s overall experience was improved because his boredom had been dealt with.

Going up Ben Nevis

Some of the moments I struggled with most were when camping. Some nights we played cards (traditional use of time when sheltering from rain and wind) and some of the time we played JetPack (a game on the iPhone that involves JetPacking through a maze of mean things that want to hurt you). While the traditionalist in me wanted us to play more cards, feeling that the JetPack screen time was somehow ‘wrong’, we were still engaged in collaborative and shared game-play even if the interface and skills were different.

As a geographer all of these issues fascinate me. How we use technology not only changes how we make sense of and record places but also how we create them, experience them and construct them in our minds. When we pick the technologies to research, navigate and share places this inevitably shapes and filters how we sense and process the places we are discovering. Just like people, places have much to offer us. By thinking about what we want from our relationships with places before we visit them and considering the technologies best suited to facilitate these, we are far more likely to have positive experiences that meet our expectations.

Dartmoor

While nature and technology often compete for attention, the reality is that they can complement, supplement and converge in extremely positive ways. Like sweets though, its the responsibility of adults to moderate how much of different kinds of screen time that children get (until they have learnt do this for themselves). We give Seb 30 minutes screen time a day (if he has done his ‘homework’) unless he earns more (by doing good things) or is doing something creative. In my mind the answer in the wild time vs. screen time debate is clear; it’s all about picking appropriate technologies and using them in moderation. What is appropriate and moderate will be different for every person, place and situation, something I need to continue to remember as we keep exploring as a family.

Follow us on #Route125 here.


Walk with predators

Wolves

I am currently working with Kitson Kazynka and the team at National Geographic Kids to put the final touches to Mission: Wolf Rescue, the second in a news series of books that helps young people to learn about endangered animals. Working with some of the  best wolf experts in the world, the book introduces a range of issues that wolves face and what we can do to help them.

While on Route 125 Seb and I completed an adventure to walk with predators in Cumbria. We were delighted to meet Maska and Kajika, two timber wolf pups, at Predator Experience. We explored a local wood with the young hybrid wolves and their handlers Dee and Daniel. the video above gives you a glimpse into our time with them. You can read the full adventure report here.

 

 


Expeditionary Football

The traditional aim of football is to kick a ball into a goal. The aim of expeditionary football is the use the ball to creatively explore a place, the goal being to discover unexpected things – who knows where the ball will roll…. It’s also a great way to reduce the amount of moaning children do when ascending a long hill, so it’s a great parenting tactic too.

When visiting Thrunton Woods in Northumberland we played an epic downhill game, making use of a number of steep mountain bike tracks and avoiding ‘wilder’ and more ‘natural’ places that we did not want to disturb. We did have a couple of tumbles, but they were worth it. Next time you go into the woods, why not take a football?

You can follow all of our #Route125 adventures on the Route 125 blog.


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